Commentary by Mike OBrien

A legria swings to her mooring off Hadlock, Z Washington. If we were to ghost past this ketch J. one foggy morning, we might guess her to be the full-keeled, 40-year-old work of Winthrop Warner or, perhaps, John Alden. We would be wrong. Launched in 1995, after seven years building, this robust cruiser came from Tom Tucker's drawing table and, despite her traditional topsides, she carries a fin keel and separate rudder. Owner Denis Dignan describes the creation of the 40-foot ketch as a Port...

Design by William Garden Commentary by Maynard Bray

Boat Stem Sides

Here is a wonderful little cruiser based on the commercial salmon trailers of the Pacific Northwest. Like her progenitors she's not speedy, but she'll have their seakindly ways. She is thoroughly practical for a crew of two at all times, with space for sleeping guests on the 6-foot double berth formed by converting the pilothouse dinette. There's a basic galley opposite the dinette, plus good steering stations below deck and on deck over the engine box. Below, forward are V-berths with an...

Three Knockabouts

Camden Class Sloop

Crowninshield Commentary by Maynard Bray From the time the first 21-foot WL knockabouts Nancy and Jane appeared in 1892, the nearly fin-keeled jib and mainsail cabin sloops day boats, really, of up to about 30 feet on deck with moderate overhangs enjoyed a widespread popularity undiminished until the First World War. Knockabout was the name given to most of these craft, whether or not they were designed to officially qualify as 15-foot, 18-foot, or 21-foot WL knockabouts as...

Scottish Yawl

In a boat this size V-berths forward, followed by toilet room, main cabin with settees port and starboard and dropleaf table between, galley aft on the port side, and quarter berth and navigation area to starboard. (In British yachting nomenclature, including the Clyde Classics brochure, the navigation space is called a nav-igatorium. What a horrible term it sounds like a padded cell for round-the-bend navigators ) The icebox is under the forward end of the quarter berth, and can be fitted with...

Design by Joseph H Hack Commentary by Joel White

A boat created by a designer for his own use is always very interesting and instructive. The designer is dealing with the most demanding client of all himself but also the ideal customer from the point of view of similar personal taste and design philosophy, and one with whom communication could hardly be better. If the designer in question is the president of a firm that deals almost exclusively with producing designs for tugboats and barges for use all over the world, then we must indeed be...

Commentary by Joel White

Joel White Boats

J was immediately intrigued when the plans for this cutter came across my desk here was a boat that is a bit outside the usual in shape, layout, and construction. Before commencing to write about her, I asked Paul Gartside, her designer, to send me more information about her purpose and conception. His reply confirmed her unusual genesis. This pilothouse cutter was designed for a couple with two very young children. They live in Bamfield, British Columbia, a lovely isolated town on the west...

Designs by William Garden Commentary by Joel White

T A 7illiam Garden has been designing boats for I t a long time. Through the years, he has drawn V Y several craft for his own use the most unusual and interesting of which is Oceanus, designed in 1954. The usual approach to a new design is to pick a length say, 40 feet overall then draw the hull envelope, and pack in what accommodations can be fitted within the shell. If the resulting layout is insufficient, then a bigger boat is drawn or one's expectations are reduced. The design approach to...

Commentary by Maynard Bray

Gaff Rig Sail Plans

Yachts designed these days for speed under sail invariably come out as a somewhat cigar-shaped hull atop a fin keel, and have a pendant-type rudder back near the after end of the waterline. They're reminiscent of the fin-keelers of 100 years ago, except they're far bigger and have a marconi instead of a gaff rig. Unquestionably, boats of this type have proven to be fast, but they're usually so damned ugly that they hold no interest for me. If I had to choose between one of those and a pretty...

Design by McCurdy Rhodes Commentary by Joel White

A eriel is a McCurdy-designed, cold-molded cutter built in British Columbia by Bent Jespersen. This boat is a nice blend of modern design, precise craftsmanship, and attention to traditional details and aesthetics. By all accounts, she is also extremely fast and well-mannered. Once again, we have a chance to examine a design executed by a professional naval architect for his own use. Such designs are always of special interest, for the designer is free from the restraints, conditions, and...

Commentary by the editors of Wooden Boat

Alden company records indicate that no boats were built to this 1929 design, we are quite fascinated by its potential as a fast and able cruiser. We're also impressed with the rather elaborate construction details, which are well worth a careful study. It's very easy to speculate on the influences that have governed the design of different boats, but the roots of this one are most assuredly the Cape Cod catboat. The differences are less beam, a stretched-out fore-body, and, of...

Design by Dave Gerr Commentary by Joel White

Schnellboot Hull Pdf

The design for Summer Kyle first came to my notice in the form of a press release from Gerr Marine. While I tend to digest press releases with a considerable sprinkling of salt, anything from the board of Dave Gerr interests me, and Summer Kyle proved to be no exception. Designs from his office are usually no-nonsense, good-looking boats, with a considerable leaning toward traditional styling. A glance at the outboard profile of this design would seem to confirm this assessment. Yet there is...

Plans and specifications by Fenwick Williams Commentary by the editors of Wooden Boat

Double-enders, from Viking longships to Pinky schooners and North Sea pilot cutters, have long been held in high esteem as seakeepers. It shouldn't be surprising, then, to see this remarkably small variation on a theme. If you're familiar with Fenwick Williams's 24-foot gaff yawl, you'll recognize the similarities to this fascinating little boat. And if the similarities carry through, there is considerably more boat here than meets the eye, for Williams's 24-footer is not only fast and...

Design by Eliot Spalding Commentary by Mike OBrien

Cab Forward Design

With a cruising speed of about 8 knots, this likable launch will move too slowly to demand a helmsman's raw-edge, wheel-clutching attention yet the scenery will pass at a rate sufficient to entertain the crew and the passengers. And I'll wager that Decoy will look as appropriate in the middle of the next century as she did last week. Eliot Spalding designed her nearly 20 years ago, but he could have completed the drawings half a century back down the road this hull is not of a rapidly evolving...

Designs by Jay R Benford Commentary by Joel White

Jay Benford Design Group

Although I have never had the inclination to be a live-aboard to use a boat as my residence should the urge overcome me, I would certainly consider Jay Benford's 35-foot Packet, or his Tramp. If the Suzy Q were to be my home, she must have more space elbow room, that is, both real and psychological than the average cruising sailboat. I always loved cruising on my 35-foot Nielsen cruising cutter Northern Crown, and I was content aboard her week after week. But, when the cruise was over, I was...

Design by David Raeburn Commentary by Joel White

The west coast of Scotland, particularly the Firth of Clyde, was once the northern center for yachting in the British Isles. Such famous designers as Fife, Watson, and Mylne lived and worked here, and most of their designs were built by the excellent boatshops of the region. A fine, friendly rivalry developed between the Scottish boats and their southern cousins from the Channel coast, where equally fine designers Nicholson, Giles, and Fox created wonderful wooden vessels for both racing and...

Stout Cruising Ketch

Springstay Mizzen And Main

The wet traffic, which will pass through the slightly-off-center companionway. We're told that half of the workbench might be sacrificed to provide space for a hanging locker. Tucker and Dignan chose the ketch rig for ease of handling by one or two people. The jib, at 335 square feet, constitutes the largest single spread of Dacron. The other sails measure as follows forestaysail 135 square feet, mainsail 300 square feet, and mizzen 139 square feet. The forestaysail sets on a club....

Table of Contents

About the Chapter I Reading the Chapter II Nesting Dinghies Chapter III Simple and Able Touring ChapterIV A Strip-Planked Touring Chapter V Two Sea Kayaks Chapter VI Two Double-Paddle Chapter VII A Sailing Chapter VIII Two Daysailers, Chesapeake Fashion 23 Chapter IX Schooner and ChapterX Two Chesapeake Skiffs Chapter XI A Rowing and Sailing Chapter XII A Lapstrake Open Chapter XIII A Sloop Chapter XIV A Beach-Cruising Chapter XV An Interclub Racing ChapterXVI An Experimental Daysailer. 49...

Designs by Robert P Beebe and Eldredge Mclnnis Commentary by Joel White

Joel White Boat Pictures

Some time ago, Mike O'Brien and I discussed our desire to review the designs of real powerboats not just flit-around-the-bay boats, but heavy-duty, long-range, oceangoing types. The happy result of these discussions was to renew my acquaintance with a book that I had read years ago, but whose virtues I had nearly forgotten. For anyone seriously interested in the oceangoing powerboat, Robert P. Beebe's Voyaging Under Power third edition, revised by James F. Leishman, International Marine,...

Design by Bruce King Commentary by Joel White

Hurley Bilge Keel Sloop

F askianna is a 50-foot LOD auxiliary cutter, designed by Bruce King for an overseas client. K.J Photographs show her to be big, fast, and modern. I can hear you saying, Isn't she a modern boat that was designed to look traditional I don't think so. She looks fine her hull appeals to me and, I expect, to many others. But I wouldn't describe her as traditional. Certainly she has many features that have appeared on older designs designs that are now labeled traditional. She has a clipper bow,...

Design by CW Paine Yacht Design Inc Commentary by Joel White

Js there anyone who hasn't daydreamed of owning a snappy little open powerboat something that looks great, goes fast, and makes a noise like Vroom A boat that will get you from here to there in nothing flat, and will make you feel like the Aga Khan or the Begum when you shwoosh into Northeast Harbor, or Newport, or Key West, or wherever it is you want to make a bit of a splash. Sure you have, you're just a little reluctant to admit to the showoff inside your buttoned-down self. Well, Charley,...

Designs by Concordia Company Commentary by Maynard Bray

Scott Sprague Boat Designs

TAT aldo Howland has always liked practical I i things, so when there was a forced reawak-V V ening to things practical in the depressed mid-1930s, he was probably a jump or two ahead when it came to boats. Waldo was running the Concordia Company then, but that was before it became a boatyard. In 1938, Concordia was a struggling little brokerage and design office on the Fairhaven, Massachusetts, waterfront with only one or two people besides Waldo in it. But one of them was an exceptionally...

Design by Antonio Dias Commentary by Joel White

Joel White Boat Designs

Antonio Dias designed this little cutter, Annabelle Two, for a customer who lives in Indiana and who sails on the medium-sized lakes in that area. The boat will be used for daysailing and occasional weekend cruising. Concern for the pollution of these lakes led the owner to consider an unusual auxiliary propulsion system for the boat. This handsome little vessel shows an interesting contrast between the new and the old She's old-fashioned looking, with plumb stem, round-fronted cabin, and...

Schooner and Flashboat

Designs by Paul Gartside Commentary by Mike O'Brien fs there one among us who has never lusted after a schooner For sailors confined by necessity or choice to small craft, the pursuit can be particularly frustrating. Paul Gartside has drawn a solution for the problem a 15-foot cold-molded daysailer beach cruiser that will let you have your schooner and trailer it, too. Though it lacks the majesty of the schooner-yacht America or the great fishing schooners, his design displays grace in full...

Design by Nelson Zimmer Commentary by Joel White

Philip Bolger Boat Plans

This little sloop by Nelson Zimmer has the feel of a real deepwater vessel, yet she is only 21 feet overall. A strong, springy sheer, a bold stem profile that just suits the V-bottom shape, a well-proportioned cabin trunk, and a good-looking, highpeaked gaff sail plan all contribute to this feeling. According to Mr. Zimmer, this design, which was drawn back in 1946, has continued to draw inquiries through the years, an indication of her wide appeal. She certainly appeals to me. I built a boat...

Designs by Albert Strange and Philip C Bolger Commentary by Mike OBrien

Paul Gartside Designs

Nearly 100 years and 3,000 miles of Atlantic Ocean separate the canoe yawl Wenda from the leeboard sharpie Martha fane. As might be expected, these shoal-draft cruisers differ considerably in construction and style, but they share similar purpose and a certain quality of independence. Implications of the name notwithstanding, canoe yawls are not canoes and need not be yawl rigged. Essentially, they are small centerboard cruisers with canoe sterns. The type evolved on the estuaries of...

Designs by Karl Stambaugh and Philip C Bolger Commentary by Mike OBrien

Karl Stambaugh Boat Designs

Both Karl Stambaugh and Phil Bolger started with similar stacks of plywood and a drawer full of traditional ideas. Both came up with trailerable pocket cruisers that measure 19 feet 6 inches on deck. There the similarity ends. Stambaugh's Mist awakens memories of plywood sloops that filled the pages of Popular Whatever magazines in the years following World War II. But, in some ways, she's quite different. Many of the early-1950s hulls were designed aggressively for sheet construction. That is...

Design by Tim Evans Commentary by Joel White

Lawrence Yawl, drawn by Canadian Tim Evans, represents an example of a growing trend in wooden boat design. She's a new design based on an old boat but with changes that allow more modern construction techniques, more efficient rigs, larger accommodations, and faster shapes. I don't have any philosophical argument with this idea, and it is always interesting to study the criteria used and the compromises made in drawing such a design. Most of the designs falling into...

Design by Cyrus Hamlin Commentary by Joel White

Wanderer is a design that was ahead of its time when drawn several decades ago, and it remains one whose time has never come, for no boat has ever been built to the plans. Cyrus Hamlin, N.A., drew the design for a prominent sailor as a boat that could race under the CCA Cruising Club of America rule with some hope of success, yet be a comfortable, seakindly, safe, and good-looking cruiser. The hull was extensively tank tested, which indicated that the boat should do well racing with her...

Designs by William Garden and Murray Peterson Commentary by Joel White

Murray Petersos Desings

Tust as a painting is influenced by the artist's envi-I ronment and early training, so is the naval archi-I tect's design affected by the area in which he lives 'and the local traditions of boatbuilding. It would be difficult to imagine a South Seas proa being developed in our cold northern waters while all sailors like to go fast, most dislike being sprayed by cold water while doing it. The two designs shown here are good examples of these influences. Both are drawn by masters of their trade,...

Design by C Raymond Hunt Associates Commentary by Joel White

Raymond Hunt Designs

While a glance at the outboard profile gives the impression of a thoroughly up-to-date power craft, the design of Sting Ray V is more than 30 years old, for she was designed in 19621963 and built in 1964. It was in 1960 that Ray Hunt and Dick Bertram revolutionized the offshore powerboat racing scene with Moppie, beginning the era of the deep-V hull. Since that time, this hull form has been used for powercraft of all types sometimes in applications where other shapes might have served better....

Commentary by William Garden

William Garden Boat Designs

Tshould qualify this design review at the start by I confessing that 1 am a certifiable boat nut. I love all JL boats. Joel White's neat little double-ender that we're reviewing here reminds me of the term vice free, an expression I've come across in New Zealand and one that brings to mind a lovely, docile sort of yacht. Vice free is a great term its opposite vice riddled brings to mind some vicious sort of down-by-the-head thing probably manned by a crew of ruffians crouched along the weather...

Designs by William and John Atkin Commentary by Mike OBrien

Atkin Boat Plans

When I was a boy, commercial watermen kept low-powered inboard skiffs. Summer people used outboard motors. The professionals knew that small inboards ran quieter, were more reliable, and stretched a gallon of fuel miles farther than the cranky outboards of that era. Since that time, four decades of relentless outboard motor development have rendered small inboard skiffs virtually extinct. Be that as it may, skiffs of the type shown here continue to offer some advantages. They carry their engine...

An Ultralight Cruiser

Form a perfect straight edge, he can compensate, to a degree, on the sail-loft floor. A word of caution Unless we actively control fully battened rigs, they want to keep sailing because the sails tend to retain their airfoil shape even with the sheets let go. We should remember this as we approach the ramp, lest we wind up in the parking lot. The designer shows two hull construction options cold-molding, and strip-planking. Both methods call for the liberal application of epoxy resins. For the...

Designs by Paul Gartside and Joel White Commentary by Maynard Bray

Paul Gartside Design

Jt has always seemed to me that the world of wooden boating is full of happy coincidences. Here's one I feel is important enough to share. It involves two of my favorite designers, one of whom is set up in Sidney, British Columbia, and the other right here where I live in Brooklin, Maine. Without knowing what the other was up to and working at drawing boards that were some 3,000 miles apart, Paul Gartside and Joel White created preliminary plans at almost the same time for double-ended, keel...

Designs by Jay R Benford and Iain Oughtred Commentary by Mike OBrien

Pocket Cruiser Rig

Back in 1976, Jay Benford sat down at his drawing table to design a small cruiser for Dick Wagner, creator and driving force behind The Center for Wooden Boats in Seattle. The result of Benford's labor, a preliminary study for an 18-foot centerboard canoe yawl, was published in the young designer's catalog. Its evocative sail plan soon was pinned to the walls of more than one boatshop along the coast. But, for various reasons, the little packet never was built. Fortunately for posterity, the...

Design by Craig V Walters Commentary by Joel White

Karl Stambaugh Sailboat

This 49-foot ketch is an interesting blend of old ideas and modern materials and technology. The old ideas were formulated nearly a century ago for developing seaworthy, shoal-draft cruising boats. Modern materials and technology help make the concept workable. This design is frankly based on Commodore Munroe's famous Presto design, but a number of recent developments have been incorporated both in materials and engineering that simply were not available to Munroe. The idea of lightweight but...

Design by George Calkins Commentary by Sam Devlin

Bartender Boat Plans

As a young boy growing up in Oregon, I had my heroes, but they weren't the ordinary movie-star type. They were the boat type, and one of them was a living legend on the Oregon coast George Calkins, designer of the renowned Bartender. The Bartender is probably George Calkins's most noteworthy contribution to boat design. As George tells it, in the 1950s his boatshop was busy building flat-bottomed plywood surf dories for use on the rough coast and bar crossings for which Oregon is famous. George...

Designs by Sam Devlin and Robert W Stephens Commentary by Mike OBrien

Devlin Boat Design

T Tere we have two easily built modified garveys, - each of strong character. Both are capable of JL JL performance that is equal, at least, to that of their stock fiberglass counterparts of fancier origin. For want of a more formal definition, garveys can be thought of as sometimes well-modeled scows that originated in the shallow bays and creeks along the Jersey Shore. Put together by different builders for different purposes, individual garveys display the considerable variety expected from...

Design by K Aage Nielsen Commentary by Joel White

While I had owned boats since childhood, this was my first large boat, a 35-foot cruising cutter named Northern Crown. The story of this purchase actually goes further back. In 1957,1 saw the plans for Northern Crown in Yachting magazine. She had just been built in Denmark by A. Walsted's yard and shipped to this country for delivery to her American owner. In addition to the cutter's plans, the Yachting article contained a couple of pictures of her under sail....

Design by Karl Stambaugh Commentary by Joel White

Paul Gartside Boat Design

Over the past few years, America has experienced a rebirth of wooden boat building. There is no question that this is true, but much of the coverage in the yachting press might lead one to think that this renaissance is limited to a few extremely elegant and expensive yachts built for those with unlimited funds and time to indulge in such hobbies. The glitz and glitter have always received more media attention than the simple and mundane yet the news is perhaps more interesting if one digs a...

Tortured Plywood Boat Plans

Resulting narrow load waterline speaks of speed, and it suggests a possible lack of sufficient stability. I've not yet had the pleasure of rowing a Flashboat, but I have pulled various West Coast designs that display remarkably similar sections. If you'll allow me the luxury of extrapolation Stability should be no problem if you're accustomed to canoes, kayaks, or high-performance pulling boats. This boat will feel tender at first, much in the manner of a light dory, but she'll seem to stiffen...

Design by Robert W Stephens Commentary by Mike OBrien

Here we have something different an easily trail-ered beach cruiser that should provide the thrills of high-performance sailing during the day and, yet, offer reasonably comfortable accommodations after the sea breeze fades. The fully battened mainsail catches our notice at first glance. This configuration might be common on catamarans and trimarans, but we don't often find small monohulls rigged in this manner. Designer Robert W. Stephens drew full-length battens because they can support...

Masthead Yawl

System, and provides a binnacle for the compass and engine controls. There is a comfortable seat with footrests for the helmsman the mainsheet traveler and winch are aft of the helmsman. The steering seat is raised so forward vision is excellent, and the helmsman is removed from the hurly-burly of the racing crew at the winches. Yet everything needed to sail the boat is near at hand. A man and wife could easily handle the boat. Indeed, Wanderer was designed for just that. There is a...

Design by Bruce Northrup Commentary by Joel White

Chesapeake Bay is the source for many unusual names used to differentiate boat types. Bugeye, skipjack, tuck-up, deadrise, pungy all of these names come to us from the Chesapeake. Here is a yacht of some size whose design is based on the Chesapeake pungy schooners. Bruce Northrup, who designed her, indicates that she is not intended to be a faithful reproduction of a pungy, but rather a cruising vessel derived from the pungies, modified to suit special conditions. Northrup, by the way, is no...

Pilothouse Cutter

Paul Gartside Yachts

The oilskin locker is shown outboard in the head, an unusual but sensible placement. Small, transparent hatches over both galley and head will admit light and air as needed. You will have noticed by now on the plans that this vessel has a center cockpit. Flanking the cockpit to port, just abaft the galley, is a single berth. There is not full headroom here, as the overhead space is made by the seat in the cockpit. But as a sleeping area it should serve well for the...

Design by Nat Benjamin Commentary by Joel White

Gannon amp Benjamin of Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts, is a boatyard of the old school dedicated to wooden vessels. Their business includes a bit of new construction, always some repair work, and the care and maintenance of a variety of wooden boats. Over the past few years there has emerged from their boatshop doors a small but steady rivulet of handsome new wooden sailing vessels, most of them designed by Nat Benjamin, one of the firm's partners. This 30-foot yawl is a fine example of the...

Designs by Weston Farmer and Howard I Chapelle Commentary by Mike OBrien

Long Narrow Displacement Boat Plans

Post-World War II America flaunted excess. Aggressively ugly automobiles serviced the ill-conceived tract houses that sprouted around nearly every city. As their contribution to this scene, boat designers or at least boat promoters contrived short, fat, and high plywood boxes that they marketed as outboard cruisers. These monstrosities ran at high speeds only on the advertising pages of boating periodicals. In real life they were slowed by any sea larger than a ripple and by totally...

An Interclub Racing Dory

Plywood Dory Boat Foot

Alden Commentary by the editors of WoodenBoat As the refinement of the Swampscott dory type reached its zenith, the need arose to depart more distinctly from the workboat origins where rowing was as important as sailing and to develop a dory type specifically for sailing in interclub races. And, as John Alden never failed to appreciate the trends of his time, he set Sam Crocker, then in his employ, to work on a sailing dory one-design class in early 1921. The result was a...

Design by Philip C Bolger Commentary by Mike OBrien

Phil Bolger Shivaree Plans

Maine outboard-powered lobsterboats enjoy a reputation for efficient speed, good load-carrying ability, and handsome appearance. Philip C. Bolger began drawing an evolving family of these skiffs in the 1950s. His latest thoughts appear in the 21-foot 4-inch Sometime or Never. This launch represents a stretched version of the designer's 16-foot Shivaree. The 16-footer has plenty of beam 7 feet , so Bolger simply increased the distance between mold stations from 2 feet to 2 feet 8 inches. He...

Design by Scott Sprague Commentary by Joel White

Stiffeners Floor Timber Vessel

This 26-foot cruising sloop, known as Al's 26, by Scott Sprague of Poulsbo, Washington, is a boat that shows the effect a particular locale can have on design. The Pacific Northwest will be her home, and the special weather patterns of that part of the world cool, with wet spells that might last a week or more are the reason for her large pilothouse and dual steering stations. The pilothouse also allows full headroom in at least part of the accommodations an unusual feature on a boat this small...

Designs by L Francis Herreshoff and Jay E Paris Jr Commentary by Joel White

Although Bounty and Lone Star bear a superficial likeness to each other, they are very different vessels. Designed for widely different purposes, they vary in concept, construction, and character. Bounty was designed and built in the early 1930s, Lone Star was launched in 1982 after a four-year building period. Although 50 years separate their conception, both are products of an evolving tradition that is centuries old. Bounty was designed by L. Francis Herreshoff as a full-keeled version of...

Design by SS Crocker Commentary by Joel White

have a theory, difficult to prove but intriguing to think about, that the best yacht designers are able to instill some of their character traits into their designs. Nat Herreshoff, genius designer, workaholic, a demon for speed, turned out a huge body of work, meticulously designed and crafted, fast and long-lived. His son, L. Francis, was inventive, eccentric, a lover of beauty and simplicity he produced a number of beautiful and simple yachts as well as some that were more inventive than...

Nesting Dinghies

Danny Greene Chameleon Dinghy

Designs by Kaufman Design, Inc., Danny Greene, and Charles M. Strayer Consider a tender's design criteria The boat must be small, yet it will be called upon to carry huge loads it should row easily, but it will be wide relative to its meager length in order to gain capacity in the interest of easy handling, it ought not weigh too much, yet we know it will suffer terrible abuse. No doubt about it, drawing a proper dinghy can be an exercise in contradiction. The three dinghies shown here address...

Designs by Accumar Headwater Boats and GlenL Marine Commentary by Mike OBrien

Karl Stambaugh Boat Designs

Among traditional boatbuilding tasks, the beveling of chine logs must rank as one of the most satisfyingly pleasant operations. You sharpen your favorite plane to near perfection, and let it slice through the wood, spewing long curls. It feels fine, sounds fine, employs no unusual chemicals, and raises no dust only wood shavings and, so long as you don't eat them or set fire to them, they seem to pose no health hazards . Some of us accept plywood composite construction techniques reluctantly,...

Design by Geerd Hendel Commentary by Joel White

Work Boat Designs Imagenes

J have always had a soft spot for long, low, fast, good-looking powerboats. And whenever I think of such a boat, Porpoise is the image that appears in my mind's eye. Oddly enough, I have never seen Porpoise in the flesh, only in pictures the same is true of my relationship with Sophia Loren. This lack of personal contact in no way diminishes my respect for the ladies in question. Porpoise's hull is nearly perfect I can think of no change that would make her better. Her superstructure is nearly...

Rowing and Sailing Skiff

Iain Oughtred Sailing Boat Images

Pete Culler Commentary by the editors of WoodenBoat This skiff was designed by Pete Culler in 1976 for our neighbor, Anne Bray. The boat is intended to serve as a tender for the Brays' summer camp on a rocky island, here in Maine. Because the island has no beach or dock, the boat must be loaded and boarded over the stern, from a sloping granite ledge. This gave rise to the boat's most unusual feature The bottom aft has no skeg and is rounded up sharply to roughly match...

Design by William Garden Commentary by Joel White

Ketch Sail Plan

Writing in Yachting magazine during the mid-1920s, Douglas P. Urry and F. Wavell Urry described three boats of their design called cogge ketches. These articles elicited a fair amount of interest among offshore cruising sailors, for the boats were handsome and oozed romance. All three boats 42 feet, 50 feet, and 65 feet LOA had round spoon bows, exaggerated sheerlines, raised poop decks, and doubly curved transoms with stern windows surmounted by large, cast-bronze stern lights of...