Designs by L Francis Herreshoff and Jay E Paris Jr Commentary by Joel White

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Although Bounty and Lone Star bear a superficial likeness to each other, they are very different vessels. Designed for widely different purposes, they vary in concept, construction, and character. Bounty was designed and built in the early 1930s, Lone Star was launched in 1982 after a four-year building period. Although 50 years separate their conception, both are products of an evolving tradition that is centuries old.

Bounty was designed by L. Francis Herreshoff as a full-keeled version of the centerboard ketch Tioga. She is an immediate ancestor of Tioga II, which later became Ticonderoga. In horse racing circles, this distinguished position would be equivalent to being the dam of Secretariat.

Lone Star was designed by Jay Paris for a Texas company as an offshore cruising boat of traditional looks, but with superior accommodations and more lasting construction techniques than were found in the Herreshoff ketches. Every advantage was to be taken of the past half-century of experience with wooden boat construction techniques — the past 50 years of development in materials, sealants, and adhesives. I believe Herreshoff would have approved.

Let us look first at the two designs in a general way. Bounty is 57 feet 6 inches on deck, and 50 feet on the waterline. Lone Star is 54 feet on deck and 45 feet on the waterline. Each has a similar underwater profile, with a shallow forefoot descending to a deep ballast keel amidships. The after deadwood is cut away to a rudderpost mounted far aft. Both boats are ketch rigged, but Lone Star has rig proportions more like a yawl — with a large main and a small mizzen.

A comparison of the two hulls shows that Lone Star is deeper in proportion to her length than Bounty, and that her hull sections are faired right down to her ballast keel. This filling out of the garboard area naturally increases the midship section, producing more room below. She also has a higher displacement/length ratio than Bounty — 241 versus 179 — and thus more volume for her length. Both hulls have lovely, easy lines and the potential for excellent speed under sail. Bounty, I believe, would be the faster of the two, not only because of her longer waterline, but also because her buttocks are flatter aft, and she looks to me to have less wetted surface for her length.

Though Bounty is longer than Lone Star she has considerably less in the way of accommodations. She might almost be called a giant daysailer. I rather like her simple, uncluttered arrangement plan, typical of yachts of her day, with separate quarters for the paid crew forward. The forward location of the galley and the limited storage space, however, make her unsuitable for offshore cruising. Lone Star, on the other hand, takes maximum advantage of the belowdecks volume, and has a great deal more comfort and stowage space for the long-distance cruiser.

Jay Paris has prepared an interesting sketch of the profiles of the two boats, showing the percentage of the interior of each used for accommodations. The drawing indicates how much more of Lone Star is given over to actual space for her crew. While this certainly improves her liveability, like all compromises it extracts a toll. Bounty's engine and tanks are aft in a space of their own, where maintenance and repairs can be performed without interruption of other activities on board. On Lone Star, because the engine is in a box under the main companionway ladder in the center of the cabin, the work on her engine must take place in the galley and the main passageway, making disruption of traffic and meals inevitable. But the reward is Lone Star's after cabin — a wonderful private space in the quietest part of the boat, where the motion is least. This cabin is connected to the rest of the accommodations by an ingenious tunnel under the centerline footrest that provides a passageway with full headroom. The construction section drawing through the cockpit shows how this tunnel is arranged.

The after cabin occupies the entire stern portion of the vessel and contains two large, comfortable berths, dressing room space with seats, and roomy lockers; a head and separate shower room are nearby. Moving forward through the tunnel, one emerges in the main cabin, and finds a large U-shaped galley to port, and a very complete navigator's station to starboard. Next forward comes the main saloon, with seating for the whole crew around a large table offset to port, much stowage space, and sleeping arrangements for two or four in a pinch.

Proceeding forward, through a door in the bulkhead at the mainmast, we find a head to port, hanging lockers to starboard, and two comfortable berths parallel to the centerline with lockers outboard. The forward portion of the boat is given over to stowage of those innumerable items of outfit that seem absolutely necessary to long-distance voyagers. Under the cockpit, and to port and starboard of the centerline passageway to the after cabin, are machinery spaces for tanks and the myriad systems that make this cruiser function.

Lone Star was built in England, at Mashford Brothers Ltd. in Cornwall. Because of her complexity, she proved to be a bit more of a job than Mashford's had bargained for. But they stuck to it, and after four years of work, a real dazzler emerged from the humble sheds in Cremyll, Cornwall.

Lone Star's garboard planks are rabbeted directly into the 16,000-pound lead keel. The forefoot and after keel are bolted to this lead casting. Much of the wood used in her construction is either teak or iroko; for instance, her single planking is teak 1 % inches in thickness. Most of the hull frames are laminated iroko. Extensive use of cast-bronze floors throughout the length of the boat ties the framing to the centerline structure. The hull fastenings, for the most part, are copper and silicon bronze. The maststeps are stainless steel weldments. Silicon-bronze diagonal strapping ties the heavy chainplate structures to the rest of the

Particulars

Herreshoffs

Particulars Paris's Lone Star LOD 54'0" LWL 45'0" Beam 13'6"

Particulars

Herreshoffs

Particulars Paris's Lone Star LOD 54'0" LWL 45'0" Beam 13'6"

Mediterranean Ship Silhouette
Draft 6'2" Displ 50,000 lbs

Schematic diagrams reveal the different use of interior space aboard Bounty and Lone Star.

Herreshoffs Bounty

Bounty carries the classic L. Francis Herreshoff ketch rig. She has less usable space below than Lone Star, but the author believes that — because of her longer waterline and flatter run — the older boat has greater speed potential. (Bounty's hull lines are superimposed on those of her near-sister, a centerboarder named TiogaJ

Sailboat Design Schematic
Bounty's hull lines from Sensible Cruising Designs, International Marine Publishing Co. Bounty's sail plan from The Common Sense of Yacht Design, Caravan-Maritime Books.

Paris's Lone Star

Connected only by a radio antenna, Lone Star's masts are independently stayed. In an attempt to avoid unpleasant optical illusions, Paris gave the boat a planar sheer. A relatively full run allows for standing headroom in the after cabin.

Paris's Lone Star

Jay Benford Design Sailboat

Two Cruising Ketches hull. All the planking butt blocks are 3/6-inch siliconbronze plates to which the plank ends are bolted.

The laid teak deck has a /a-inch mahogany plywood subdeck, all fastened to laminated iroko deckbeams. The cabin trunk is mostly teak, finished bright, with a laid teak housetop. There are multiple bilge stringers, and heavy iroko clamps and shelves at the deck edge. A great deal of time was lavished on the construction plans and specifications to ensure a strong and enduring hull structure.

There is a break in Lone Star's deck at the forward end of the cockpit, and the entire afterdeck is raised in order to provide headroom in the stern cabin without the need for a house. Many people looking at this boat do not realize until going below that there is a large cabin tucked under the afterdeck. Because of the location of this cabin, the cockpit is farther forward than normal. This has the great advantage of putting the mizzenmast and all its clutter entirely abaft the cockpit. (To my mind, the biggest drawback of the ketch rig is that the mizzenmast and its rigging are so often directly in the middle of affairs in the cockpit.) Both the jib and the staysail are roller furling — a convenient arrangement, but one that usually does not make for the most efficient headsails.

The large mainsail and small mizzen mentioned earlier will ensure better windward performance than ketch rigs of more normal proportions. Off the wind, with her fair lines and good form stability, Lone Star is capable of making very good days' runs when the breeze is up and the crew is eager. She is also designed to keep that crew happy, comfortable, and well-fed on long passages.

I have a couple of minor quibbles: for one thing, Lone Star would look better to my eye if her sheer were raised 4 or 5 inches forward. And, I strongly suspect that if Jay Paris were to sit down today to design another boat to her specifications, he would enclose her in a slightly larger envelope — perhaps increasing her waterline length to 48 or 50 feet. A complex project such as this always grows a bit along the way, and more items get added to the inventory than were originally planned. Additional weight creeps aboard, and the designed waterline disappears below the surface. But these are minor problems — the overall result is magnificent.

Lone Star shows that careful design and engineering, combined with the best of materials shaped by master craftsmen in the old tradition of wooden boat building, can produce a truly superior vessel.

Jay Paris can be reached at Designautics, P.O. Box 459, Brunswick, ME 04011.

Plans for Bounty are available from Elizabeth R. Vaughn, The Yacht Designs ofL. Francis Herreshoff 620 GallandSt., Petaluma, CA 94952.

Plans for Bounty are available from Elizabeth R. Vaughn, The Yacht Designs ofL. Francis Herreshoff 620 GallandSt., Petaluma, CA 94952.

Francis Herreshoff

180-

Lone Star's centerlinefootrest provides support for the crew in the cockpit, creates effective sumps under the floorboards, and results in a full-headroom passageway below.

180-

Lone Star's centerlinefootrest provides support for the crew in the cockpit, creates effective sumps under the floorboards, and results in a full-headroom passageway below.

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