Within visual range standard signals of distress

Stand on deck and semaphore repeatedly RUN (below) 2. Morse SOS by sound, light, or any ready means 3. Ensign flown inverted, or black shape, etc. 4. Red flares at intervals of thirty seconds Red flares - like SOS or MAYDAY -must never be used unless life is in danger, and if a ship comes in response to your call, you must be prepared to abandon your boat and be rescued. Do not count on anybody seeing your red flares, however. If your boat is above 18 feet, you are legally required to carry...

Chapter Heavy Weather

The amount of thought that must be given to preparing for heavy weather is out of proportion to the number of times you will encounter it. You may expect to be out in Force 5 winds a few times on a cruise even if you listen to the radio and avoid going out when strong winds are forecast. I would not call this heavy weather, however. Force 5 winds normally require a reef, and probably a change from the genoa to the working jib. This should become an easy routine through practice. Often it is...

British Isles Coasts and Rivers Vol I

Voyage Around Raasay by Robin Sutherland W3146 A Cruise to Lundy by Ken Hughes W793 Harbour Hopping in Cornwall by Ken Hughes W793 Six Days on the Fal, Cornwall by Bill Lindsley W3687 Round the Isle of Wight by Pippa and Tony Davis W2254 Chichester to Wareham by Mike Gale and Christine Wilkinson W1856 Scotland, Oban Area by Peter Grainger W1151 Shannon Cruise, Eire by D. Kite W84 British Isles Coasts and Rivers Vol. II East Coast, Scotland and Solent Cruises by Ann Devine W382 Norfolk to...

Chapter Cooking and Catering by Joy Phillips

This chapter clearly falls into three parts In our experience, no stove beats an open fire. When circumstances permit, this is undoubtedly the most economical way to cook. It gives the widest range of temperatures, is the most fun, and saves on the fuel you have to carry in your boat. By open fire we do not mean a blazing bonfire. There is no point in risking life, limb and the forest, for the sake of a cup of coffee. An old saying goes White man build big fire sit far Indian build small fire...

Appendix D Addresses

(Tim France and Uncle Al have done their best to update addresses and add links as of Jan. 2002 but these of course are subject to change ) Canadian Hydrographic Service Chart Distribution Office, Ottawa, Ontario K1G 3H6. (613) 998-4931 www.chs-shc.dfo-mpo.gc.ca The Canadian Aids to Navigation System (their Information Bulletin 1 is the catalogue, and also lists chart dealers in all major cities.) Radio Aids to Maritime Navigation List of Lights, Buoys and Fog Signals Canada Centre for Inland...

Yorkshire Spice Cake

Three-quarters cup shortening 1 1 2 cups brown sugar 4 tsp. baking powder 1 2 tsp. salt Ground nutmeg and allspice (about 1 2 tsp. each, or according to taste) 1 cup milk 3 cups currants 1 cup raisins 1. Beat shortening, sugar and eggs 2. Add dry ingredients, sifted together 5. Pour batter into greased 14X9 tin and bake in pre-heated 325 oven for 1 1 2 -2 hours. (Check it after one hour ovens vary, and if yours tends to be hot, it would be better to line the tin with greased paper, bake for a...

Chapter Spares and Repairs

There is no redundancy in dinghy design, and if something breaks far from civilization you must be able to repair it yourself. It is worth thinking about the ways in which you would tackle different problems. A broken centreboard could be one of the worst problems. We have considered carrying a spare (one per fleet), but it is really too big. If it broke near a lee shore, you would probably have to row off, or perhaps by using oars or paddles as leeboards you could try to work to weather under...

Chapter Rigging and Sails

Back Wind Tack The Genoa

Polluted, you are never going to die of thirst. Where the lake water is drinkable, you need carry only enough for 2448 hours, which you may need at a campsite where the local water is unfit for drinking. Replenish your water containers when you are out on open water. In more populated areas, carry enough for three or four days, as not all places where you camp will have good water. Two or three smaller containers are better than one large one, for ease of handling. Flashlights and Spare...

Equipment that is not legally required but is advisable

Most of the following items are desirable or essential for a camping cruise depending upon the amount of open water you plan to cross and the conditions you might encounter. A good deal less would be needed if you were going to make only a five-mile sail across the bay. Oars. Get the longest oars you can, as the longer they are, the easier it is to row. The limitation on this will be convenient stowage, which usually has to be on the sole of a dinghy. Oar-locks should be placed as far outboard...

Appendix A Wayfarer Cruise Logs on line

For the most recent postings, mostly complete with better photos than the book-form cruise logs, go to The 2001 North Channel Cruise as seen and experienced by Uncle Al Nova Scotia Cruise 2000 by Jim Fraser Ted Davis Trophy Winner Maine Cruise 2000 by Alan Parry and Dick Harrington Lost and Found and Fooling Around McGregor Bay Uncle Al and Doug Gilchrist report their experiences from the 1997 North Channel Cruise led by Tim France Ted Davis Trophy Winner McGregor Bay Revisited in '99 by Doug...