Food

A Jig for St. Patrick and Poseidon

For this Irish-American sailor, the splendors of the Mediterranean must take a backseat to hometown traditions on a feast day BY LYNDA MORRIS CHILDRESS

The Saint Paddy's Day mo rning was bright and clear at Marina Alimos—otherwise called simply Kalamaki—outside Athens, Greece. My husband, Kostas, and i were spending some liveaboard-and-maintenance time on our Atlantic 70, Stressbuster. The docks were abuzz with crews preparing boats for the upcoming sailing season. The whine of electric sanders, drills, the noisy arrival of truck-borne fuel vendors backing madly down the quay, and the exuberant shouts of Greeks filled the air.

Normally I find the sights and sounds of the marina work life invigorating, but as a 100-percent Irish-American, I wanted none of it that day. I was in the mood for festivity. While a pot of strong coffee

Oven-Cooked Irish Stew

2 pounds stewing beef 1/3 cup flour 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried sage

1 teaspoon garlic powder salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

1/4 cup olive oil

2 12-ounce bottles Guinness beer 10 baby onions, peeled

2 cloves garlic, minced 2-3 tablespoons tomato paste 2-3 carrots, sliced 2 cups frozen peas

1 large potato, peeled and diced

2 cubes beef bouillon 1 bunch fresh parsley

Cut beef into bite-sized pieces. In a reseal-able plastic bag, toss together beef, flour, thyme, sage, garlic powder, salt, and pepper until meat is lightly but evenly coated. Sauté in olive oil until browned on all sides. Add a healthy splash of beer to carmelize pan juices, scraping browned bits from bottom of pan. Reduce heat and add onions, garlic, and brewed, I donned a deep-emerald T-shirt from my Dartmouth College days, with "Green"—appropriate for the day—emblazoned in large white letters on the front. I popped in an Irish-music CD, turned on the outside speakers, turned up the volume, and danced a jig on deck, much to the amusement of the surrounding crews, who applauded vigorously, though no doubt they thought I'd completely lost my mind.

When I retired below to sip coffee, I set aside my can of varnish, brush, and mineral spirits to plan a late-afternoon Irish meal. I craved corned beef and cabbage. I craved the St. Patrick's Day parade in my native Newport, Rhode Island, and its accompanying festivities. Alas, neither corned beef nor the parade were to be had here, so I settled on the next best thing: preparing my late mother's oven-cooked Irish stew and Irish soda bread, the ultimate comfort foods. I persuaded Kostas, a Greek born in Athens, to sling aside the tools and the cans of Deks Olje and take the day off. After provisions were duly stowed, we set off for a sail to nearby Cape S ouni on, home of the famous temple of Poseidon, the Greek god of the sea. We skimmed along downwind in a gentle breeze. Below, the stew simmered delectably in the oven as we sailed.We dropped anchor by the beach beneath the spectacular temple on the hill and popped open some celebratory Guinness while the rich smells of stew and baking bread wafted out of the galley. As evening drew near, the temperature cooled, and the bowls of steaming stew and warm bread were like manna from heaven. As a large, crimson sun dropped over the horizon, we ate in the cockpit and raised a toast to St. Paddy. Gazing up at Poseidon's temple bathed in the glow of sunset, I figured that maybe I didn't miss parades or corned beef and cabbage so much after all.

tomato paste. Stir and simmer briefly. Add carrots, peas, diced potato, and bouillon. Stir; transfer stew to an oiled, oven-proof casserole. Pour remaining Guinness over stew; stir. Cover and bake in a 350 F oven for 1 to 2 hours, until meat and vegetables are cooked, checking frequently and adding beer or water and adjusting seasonings as necessary. If stew broth seems too thin, mix together a little flour and water and stir into stew immediately after removing from oven. Garnish with parsley. Serve with Irish soda bread.

tomato paste. Stir and simmer briefly. Add carrots, peas, diced potato, and bouillon. Stir; transfer stew to an oiled, oven-proof casserole. Pour remaining Guinness over stew; stir. Cover and bake in a 350 F oven for 1 to 2 hours, until meat and vegetables are cooked, checking frequently and adding beer or water and adjusting seasonings as necessary. If stew broth seems too thin, mix together a little flour and water and stir into stew immediately after removing from oven. Garnish with parsley. Serve with Irish soda bread.

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How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

Lets start by identifying what exactly certain boats are. Sometimes the terminology can get lost on beginners, so well look at some of the most common boats and what theyre called. These boats are exactly what the name implies. They are meant to be used for fishing. Most fishing boats are powered by outboard motors, and many also have a trolling motor mounted on the bow. Bass boats can be made of aluminium or fibreglass.

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