Stepbystep Refit By Quinn Olson

Complete Makeover for Dancing Bear

Part II: On a horse farm north of Seattle, a battered but able 40-year-old Cal 40 is magically transformed

Last month, my cousin Mark Schrader began to discuss how we overhauled his ancient Cal 40 for last summer's running of the Transpac ocean race (see "New Dance with an Old Partner," February 2006). This month, I'll get into more detail about how the big project unfolded.

My first look at Dancing Bear came in late January 2004. She looked a wreck. The interior top coat appeared to be very old latex paint and was peeling off in sheets. All the old bronze hardware was avocado green. The interior had been half-gutted. However, though she would clearly require the full treatment, she still looked structurally sound. The quality of Bill

Lapworth's lines and Jensen Marine's original construction was obvious.

Mark's stated goal was to update both the equipment and the boat to turn her into a dry, comfortable, performance-oriented cruiser for singlehanded and shorthand-ed sailing. He wanted her strong enough for extended passages and longer adventures but light enough to be competitive in such races as the Transpac. To accomplish this, we planned to gut her, sand her, and paint her, then put her back together. Looking back, it's amazing how one simple sentence can translate into so many hours. Mark and I came to an amicable agreement that included, for my use, the luxurious living quar-

With the goal of making Dancing Bear a performance cruiser for singlehanded and shorthanded sailing, her interior was gutted, and new cabin furniture, including berths and a forward-facing nav station, was installed.

Stripping the interior made it possible to retab the bulkheads and floor pan and to rebuild the hull/deck joint from the inside. This meant that her recently renovated topsides wouldn't have to be repainted.

With the goal of making Dancing Bear a performance cruiser for singlehanded and shorthanded sailing, her interior was gutted, and new cabin furniture, including berths and a forward-facing nav station, was installed.

Stripping the interior made it possible to retab the bulkheads and floor pan and to rebuild the hull/deck joint from the inside. This meant that her recently renovated topsides wouldn't have to be repainted.

It's why we created the

If you believe that every sail should be an enjoyable and rewarding experience, that the ideal performance daysailer should combine comfort simplicity and style, then the e33 Is the boat you've been waiting for.

Jeremy Wurmfeld Wurmfeld Design

Robbie Doyle America's Cup Veteran

Dirk Kneulman & Don Oakie

Ontario Yachts

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FAST AND EASILY DRIVEN V-HULL, HIGH STABILITY AND HIGH LIFT FOILS.

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How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

Lets start by identifying what exactly certain boats are. Sometimes the terminology can get lost on beginners, so well look at some of the most common boats and what theyre called. These boats are exactly what the name implies. They are meant to be used for fishing. Most fishing boats are powered by outboard motors, and many also have a trolling motor mounted on the bow. Bass boats can be made of aluminium or fibreglass.

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