Yacht Harbor

1 ' 1 1-1 SKETCH CHART III-10 Rodney Bay Yacht Harbor SKETCH CHART III-10 Rodney Bay Yacht Harbor anchorage in 10 feet of water with the fort on an eastern peak of Pigeon Island bearing 315, a distinctive cliff north of the causeway bearing 035, and the breakwaters forming the entrance to Rodney Bay bearing 155 magnetic. Feel your way in with the fathometer and or lead line. Pigeon Island was formerly owned by Mrs. Josette Leigh, better known in yachting circles as Madame Snowball. Her...

ANSE A lANE

As you leave Anse Mitan and head for Cap Salomon and the mouth of Baie de Fort-de-France, you come to Anse L'Ane. It is a real sleeper one of the more attractive anchorages in the area and until recently was seldom used by yachtsmen. It is quieter, with nowhere near so many people as Anse Mitan. Yet it has an attractive hotel at its western end and a number of restaurants along the beach. The easternmost one is a drinking man's delight a classic petit punch for four francs three dollars' worth...

Petit Mustique

A small steep island south of Mustique with no anchorages and of little interest. It is not visited by yachtsmen, so far as I know. Well to windward of Petit Canouan. If you are heading south from Mustique, this is a possible place to anchor for a night in settled conditions. But the only person I know who has spent the night here is Richard Scott Hughes, a famous charter skipper, who stopped here when skippering Boekanier, a 65-foot schooner. John Corbet of Freya claims that you are likely to...

Baie Du Galion

(II 1, A, B, A-30, A-301 Sketch Chart III-6) A large open bay with several anchorages but not much to warrant more than a lunch stop. A reef runs south from the mainland east of Pointe Brunet, giving good shelter from the sea. Moor close to the reef at its northern end as close to shore as you dare. This puts the boat out of the swell, but there is still plenty of wind sweeping across the reef. Another good anchorage is north of Pointe Brunet, off an old farm that is still in operation. There...

Dun

We were there in September 1964 when a hurricane up north was kicking up a ground swell over 6 feet high along the east coast of Martinique, large enough for the seas to crest in 15 feet of water. Lying in the northeast corner of Cul-de-Sac Tartane, we felt not the slightest motion it was as smooth as a mill pond, with a pleasant breeze hooking around Pointe Caracoli, and no bugs. The water is either shoal or very deep and everywhere steep-to. I was able to lay lolaire...

O

ti ' . .< 5 ' , breaks in heavy weather SKETCH CHART 111-43 Grenville Harbor SKETCH CHART 111-43 Grenville Harbor the best part. Only a tape recorder could catch the true flavor of the show. Grenville Harbor is sheltered, but its entrance and exit are not easy, and the buoys have in the past been unreliable. The last time I was there, there were no range marks, and the outer two buoys were missing. We were informed that de range mark fall down and de buoy is sunk and we is negotiatin' for a...

Info

Range A- Cliff of Grand Col Point in line with midpoint of Saline Bay dock leads over wreck. Range B Peak of Petit Martinique over western low land of Palm leads over wreck. Note Use ranges cautiously and only for finding wreck otherwise you may become one yourself. hooking around the point will throw you beam-to to the sea and you will roll badly. Note the condition of the tide If you sneak too far in and the tide goes out from under you, it may be a few hours of rough bumping before you get...

East Coast Of Canouan

For the seasoned sailor, deep water can be carried to windward around Friendship Point and a good way north inside the reefs (Sketch Chart 111-22). Boats drawing 8 feet have gone up through here. Within the reefs the current is always running south and at times too strongly for a person to swim against. You will find complete privacy here, good swimming and snorkeling, and great shelter. A boat drawing 5 feet or less can easily make its way north all the way to the head of the bay carefully....

Index

Adam Island, 148 Admiralty Bay, 4, 12, 13 air transportation, xix-xx Anna's Shoal, 139 Anse L' ne, 24-25 L'Anse aux pines (Prickly Bay), 8, 9, 142, 146 47 Anse Chemin, 87 Anse des Pitons, 56-57 Anse Dufour, 25 L'Anse Goyeau, 95 Anse Mitan, 22-24 Anse Noire, 25 Anthony Rock, 10 Antigua, 7 Arlets, 25-27 Ashton, 112-13 Aubin, 33 Aves Island, 7-8 Bacaye Harbor, 8, 149, 151 Bacolet Point, 10 Baie de Saintp e, 37 Baie des Tourelles, 22 Baie du Carenage, 22 Baie du Galion, 37 Baliceaux, 4, 91-92...

Mayreau Island

(II B-3, B-31, B-311 Sketch Chart 111-26) Mayreau is three miles south of Union, and its peaks should not be confused with those of Union, which are only half as high. Some years ago the people of Mayreau were living at a bare subsistence level. Today the island appears much more prosperous the old houses are being fixed up and painted, and some new ones built. (Tourism has certainly brought some advantages to these small islands.) Saline Bay is a large open bay on the southwest side of the...

Bibliography

Virgin Island, Sailing Directions. 1952. Privately printed by the Coast Guard Auxiliary in the early 1950s. Carey, Charles, and E. A. Raiwhold. Virgin Anchor-aging. A superb collection of aerial photographs. Chubb, Percy, III. Cruising Guide to the Windward and Leeward Islands of the Eastern Caribbean. 1961. Privately printed. Eggleston, George Teeple. Virgin Islands. 1959 reprinted, Huntington, N.Y. Krieger, 1974. Available at Palm Passage Bookstore, St. Thomas. Eiman, William J....

Preface

When I first bought lolaire in 1957, I found on board what was then the only straight cruising guide to the Lesser Antilles. This was a mimeographed publication produced by the Coast Guard Auxiliary and edited by a Lieutenant Commander Buzby. Carleton Mitchell's Islands to Windward, published in 1948, was generally regarded as a good cruising yarn rather than as a cruising guide, but it did have some basic cruising information in the back of the book. Unfortunately, by the time I started...

Martinique

Martinique is one of the largest and most populous islands in the Eastern Caribbean, with 425 square miles and 340,000 people. The spoken languages are two strains of French, one fairly pure and the other an indecipherable patois. The natives, who are in fact French citizens, regard themselves as Frenchmen rather than West Indians, and this is reflected everywhere. Fort-de-France is a sort of Paris of the New World. Its women are beautiful and well dressed, and the sidewalk caf s are always...

Union Island

(II B-3, B-31, B-311 Sketch Chart 111-27) As the Grenadines go, Union Island is fairly large. Its population is sparse, with only two small villages, Clifton and Ashton. It is easily spotted from a distance by rock pinnacles that bristle the sky like large spikes. The island is three miles long and two miles across at its broadest. A beautiful hotel, the Bougainvillea, was built in the northeast corner of Clifton Harbor by Andr and Simone Beaufrand. They also build a dock, ice plant, slipway,...

Anse Des Pitons

A short way south of Soufri re is by far the most spectacular anchorage in the Lesser Antilles. On either side are the Pitons, towering about 2500 feet in the air. At the head of the bay in the northeast corner is an excellent anchorage, off the Jalousie boathouse, as long as you are able to find bottom. The only way to moor is to sail in close, drop a stern anchor about 50 yards offshore, luff up, and have someone jump off the bow with line to tie to a coconut tree. I have lain within half a...

Tobago

SKETCH CHART OUTLINES st Giles is in prices, Tobago's salvation seems to be in the field of tourism. The island is well suited for this, with its beautiful beaches, fair number of hotels, and superb scenery. It also has more birds than any other Eastern Caribbean island the island was never plagued with poisonous snakes and thus escaped mongoose infestation. Mongooses were imported to other islands to eliminate the snakes once the mongooses got rid of the snakes they started on the birds. Hence...

Grenada South Coast To St Georges Harbor

Do not leave harbors like Bacaye or Calivigny until the sun is high, because in the early morning the path of the sunlight is directly in line with the exit course. Once clear of the harbors on the south coast of Grenada, it is best to head directly for Glover Island, keeping an eye open for Porpoise Rocks (Grampuses) pass close south of Porpoise Rocks and then head for Point Saline. As I said earlier, reefs do extend well offshore between Calivigny Island and Prickly Point. Check bearings and...

Y

V 7 Shoal y Quarantine War II a German submarine entered after dark, sank a freighter along the dock, and departed, allegedly leaving an unexploded torpedo embedded in the soft mud under the town. There is deep water up to fairly close inshore. As of March 1986, dredging and filling were still going on in Castries Harbor on the northern side on the Vielle Ville shoal southeast of Vigie Cove in addition, a barge sunk off the end of the airport runway, supposedly lit, has not...

Culdesac Grenade

(II 1, A, B, A-30, A-301, French 384, 385 Sketch Chart III-5) Cul-de-Sac Grenade is not very well spoken of by the French, but I found it a delightful spot, a perfect anchorage, and a wonderful place to try out the sailing dinghy or explore with an outboard. In fact, with a dinghy one can stay inside the inner reefs and visit almost all the remaining east coast of Martinique, all the way to Robert, 10 miles to the north. Spotting the break in the reef that leads into Cul-de-Sac Grenade is none...

St Georges Harbour

George's Harbor Range A Two red lights ashore in line leads east of Anna's Shoal, 142-322 magnetic. Range B Two red-orange lights in line lead along Harbor Channel, 079-259 magnetic. Range C Harbor reef buoy under Government House leads clear of Ross Point Shoal, 060-240 magnetic. Note Buoy lights are totally unreliable some posts marking the channel have been knocked down and also pick you up at Food Fair, where you can load all your groceries directly into the water...

Blue Lagoon

(II B, B-3, B-30 Sketch Chart 111-15) With Caribbean Sailing Yachts' southern fleet of around forty-five boats based in Blue Lagoon, plus a few local yachts, Blue Lagoon is not the quiet anchorage it used to be. There is barely maneuvering room, much less anchoring space, and it is not run for visiting yachts or yachtsmen. The only way a visiting yacht can use this harbor is to anchor bow-on to shore by the Sugar Mill Inn's beach bar. Approach shore slowly, throw out a stern anchor, and sail in...

Mouillage De Ste Anne

(II 1, A, B, A-30, A-301 Sketch Chart 4) This is one of the most attractive anchorages in the whole area. An excellent shelter in normal trade-wind weather, the entrance is simple and straightforward. Anchor west of town in 2 fathoms, feeling your way in the bottom shoals gradually. Once there, you have easy access to the town of Ste. Anne. This is basically a resort town, so the stores seem to be open seven days a week until late in the evening. A fish market, a small vegetable market, two or...

Friendship

(II B-2, B-3, B-31 Sketch Chart 111-19) Well worth a visit by boat or taxi from Elizabeth Town. It is easy to enter merely stay in the middle of the entrance to the harbor, steering 035 magnetic for the Friendship Bay Hotel flagpole. Anchor in the eastern corner of the harbor, where there is the best protection from the ground swell. This is a smooth anchorage for the most part, although it SKETCH CHART 111-19 Bequia, Friendship Bay SKETCH CHART 111-19 Bequia, Friendship Bay is prone to some...

Grenada To Carriacou

George's, plans must be made to arrive at Carriacou early in the day and in no event later than 1700. This necessitates a very early departure from St. George's. Many boats motor-sail all the way up the coast to David Point and then set sail for Carriacou. If you choose to sail the coast, it is best done close inshore. Every time you get a mile offshore on starboard tack, you should tack back in. There is little or no wind on the lee coast of Grenada until after...

Bottom Paint Eastern Caribbean

Street's Cruising Guide to the Eastern Caribbean, The Islands are accessible in every part, and covered with a vast variety of lofty trees, which, it appears to me, never lose their foliage, as we found them fair and verdant as in May in Spain. Some were covered with blossoms, some with fruit, and others in different stages, according to their nature. The nightingale and a thousand other sorts of birds were singing in the month of November wherever I went. There are palm-trees in these...

Sketch Chart Olstunzz

Sailboat Sketches

There are a number of good hotels on St. Vincent. The best thing to do is pick up a tourist guide to the island which lists all the hotels. They are varied, and you are sure to find a hotel to suit your taste and pocket. The shopping situation, from a yachtsman's standpoint, is not too good. There is no really good big supermarket. Instead, you have to go from store to store and spend a day acquiring about half of what you really want. The open-air market is excellent and operates every day...

Chatham

The other good anchorage of Union Island, Chatham, was uninhabited until some years ago an individual in search of privacy built a small cottage. He is seldom visited by anyone except a few of the local fishermen. Inside Chatham Bay, hard gusts have a tendency to blow out of the hills with surprising force. They are not dangerous in themselves, but they may lead you to believe that it is howling outside. Boats have hung back timorously in the harbor for days on end expecting raging gales...

Anse Mitan

II 1, A, B, A-30 Sketch Chart III-2 The chart lists it as Anse de Cocotiers Anse Mitan, the local name, is more commonly used. This is an indisputably fine anchorage and understandably popular with the French. It has one of the few decent beaches in the area within easy access of the town a three-mile reach coming and going. A word of warning to those sailing from the anchorage off the Savanne Do not head directly for Anse Mitan or else you will come to a resounding halt against the shoal that...

Ilet Staubin

II, 1, A, B, A-30, A-301 Sketch Chart III-8 I visited this place for the first time in 1985, and I feel we have discovered an anchorage that is not included in any previous guides. That this is a good anchorage was news even to Philippe Lachesnez, who has spent his lifetime cruising Martinique's waters. Approach it from the east as you would La Trinit , swing around the north end of St.-Aubin, jibe around the island, head south, eyeball your way right up behind the reef, and anchor in 50 to 60...

Charts

I used to carry on board Iolaire about 200 U.S., British, French, Dutch, and a few Spanish charts all of which were out of date that is, although they were new charts, the various government offices had not accurately corrected and updated them. The British Admiralty will correct charts of a foreign area only if the government concerned officially notifies the BA. Much worse, U.S. charts are corrected only when the whole plate is corrected if you buy a new chart of Puerto Rico and it is a...

Battowia

II 1, B, B-3, B-30, B-31 Sketch Chart 111-21 So far as I know, this, too, is seldom visited by yachtsmen. There is no harbor whatsoever. If the trades are not blowing too hard, an anchorage can be had west of the reefs extending to the west of Church Cay. A Bahamian moor will be required here, since the current runs strongly through the break between Battowia and Baliceaux. I am told by the fishermen that a landing by dinghy can be made in the cove on the southeast corner of the island. Here,...

Tyrell

tf Man9 gt Yes gt gt 375 1 Lat. 12 27' 30 N lVz fathoms is actually shallower, lolaire brushed it at 7V2 feet, as have others with even less. The spot is easily seen in good light, and it is safe and advisable to steer north or south of it. The north side is probably the better route, but as you tack in along the north shore, watch out for the shoal in the corner of the harbor near the entrance to the carenage. Similarly, if you tack in along the south shore, you must watch out for rocks 200...

Petit Canouan

Four miles northeast of Canouan, this is steep-to and offers no anchorage possibilities. The British island of Canouan is one of the largest in the Grenadines and remains one of the least known and least populated. It offers a variety of good anchorages to visiting yachtsmen. If you are approaching from the south, the westernmost peak of the island, Glass or Glossy Hill, will appear detached from the rest. The narrow, low-lying, sand spit that separates it from Taffia Hill is hard to spot from...

Trinidad and Tobago

Peninsula Paria Topo Map

II B, D DMA 24402, 24403, 24404 BA 483, 493, 505, 508 Trinidad and Tobago form one independent state within the British Commonwealth. It was discovered by the Spanish on Columbus' third voyage. At the head of a small fleet, Columbus entered the Gulf of Paria through Serpents Mouth and anchored. A minor volcanic eruption evidently caused a tidal wave or bore to sweep through the gulf, inflicting considerable damage to his fleet. He then moved north across the gulf and anchored under the south...

Acknowledgments

Yachtsmen who cruise the Caribbean should be thankful to Phelps Piatt of Dodd, Mead, who saw my original draft of what was then going to be a privately printed guide to the Virgin Islands and liked it enough to encourage me to write a complete guide to the other islands. Yachtsmen should also thank Bernard Goldhirsch of United Marine Publishers, founder of Sail magazine, who did the 1974 updated and expanded cruising guide. Thanks are now due to Eric Swenson of W. W. Norton and Company, who not...