BS Highwaymans hitch

Also known as: Draw hitch

The name highwayman's hitch comes from the fact the knot was supposedly used by robbers to insure a swift release for their horses' reins and thus a rapid get-away. A single pull on the working end unties the knot, but the standing part can safely be put under tension.

cow hitch

Ahoknoii'ii as: Lanyard hitch

This hitch, composed of two single hitches, is generally made around a rin^ and is probably the least secure of all the hitches, and it should be regarded as only a temporary fastening. Its name suggests its most common use ■ as a means of tethering livestock.

Timber hitch

Timber hitch

This distinctive-looking knot is really only a temporary noose, formed by twisting the working end around its own part and not around the standing part. Three twists are usually sufficient to secure the rope around such objects as tree trunks, planks or poles so that they may be raised or lowered or dragged or pulled. More twists may be needed if the object to be moved is especially thick. Unfortunately, this knot is easily tied incorrectly.

When a single hitch is added to the nearer en4 of a log or spar, with a timber hitch at the further end, the resulting KiUick hitch enables the load lo be digged without it swinging around.

When a single hitch is added to the nearer en4 of a log or spar, with a timber hitch at the further end, the resulting KiUick hitch enables the load lo be digged without it swinging around.

BB Transom knot

Gardeners will find the transom knot particularly useful for making trellises or tying up bean poles. It is similar to the constrictor knot (see page23), and, as with that knot, the ends maybe trimmed off for neatness. Although it can be prized undone, it is probably easier simply to cut through the diagonal, when the two halves will fall apart.

Tying together the cross-bars of a kite is Itest done with a Transom knot.

Tying together the cross-bars of a kite is Itest done with a Transom knot.

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