Gusty Conditions

When hit by a gust when sailing downwind bear away, ease sheets and run with it. Gusty conditions can be treacherous to safe multihull sailing if you are not prepared for them. There are a few rules which will reduce the risk of capsize. Do not carry too much sail in gusty wind. If the wind strength is rapidly fluctuating or changing direction reef as you would for the maximum wind speed in the gusts. A smart sailor knows what sail is needed in what wind strengths. It is possible to construct a...

Anchoring

Anchoring a multihull successfully requires the right anchor for the bottom conditions, the correct chain and rode arrangement and burying the anchor effectively. The classic anchors (e.g. Bruce, Danforth, CQR) come with recommended weights for length yachts. Do not underestimate the required anchor weight because your multihull is lighter than a monohull of equivalent length. Multihulls put a different load on anchors as they sail on the mooring line. In reality most multihulls need about one...

The Line

NOTES & IDEAS Gavin LeSueur built his first multihull, a 16ft Mosquito catamaran, while at high school. After graduating from Melbourne University in Medicine, he purchased and moved aboard a 35' Hedley Nicol 'Wanderer' trimaran. To learn as much about multihull sailing he decided to compete in the two-handed Bicentennial Around Australia Yacht Race. For this adventure he attained the then fastest offshore racing catamaran in Australia - a 37ft Crowther Super Shockwave named D Flawless As...

Dinghy

At anchor the dinghy will usually manage to find its way under a catamarans bridgedeck or the wing of a trimaran. If the painter goes under a trimarans high riding ama then the dinghy may even jam and sink. At best the stuck dinghy will wake you up from a blissful sleep. At worst it will damage hull sides and sometimes sink itself. Pull them on deck. Many cruising multihulls have two dinghies - an inflatable which packs away and a sturdy work dinghy. Sailboards are easily stowed but avoid...

Capsize Survival Tactics

If you are in borderline conditions and capsize is about to happen then the best place to be is in the hull and well padded from sharp edges and objects. If you have to be on the helm then think through what you will do if capsize occurs. Once under water it may be difficult to undo the harness. Always wear a safety harness that can be A hook type attachment would be suitable for the other end. When the multihull is inverted there may be air traps in the cockpit but none are certain....

Boat Speed

Trimaran Central Crossbeam

Radar works well on a multihull because of the minimal heeling. If mounted on a rotating mast then a correction device is needed to allow for the rotation angle. Radar should not be mounted too high nor too low. With height the pitching is increased and the radar will not detect low level targets e.g. coral reefs or breaking waves. A 16 mile radar needs only to be four metres above sea level. If lower than four metres the beam can cause medical problems as they work on microwaves (similar to a...

Not Just A Boat Race

A multihull experience from the first page. 8000 miles of drama, tragedy and triumph in the toughest coastal race in the world -around Australia. A real adventure story more than its fair share of controversy a great read particularly on multihulls. Australian Yachting Magazine Not only is The Line great reading, but the reality of the story, the truth in every line, is quite inspirational. LeSueur has an impresive ability to capture the moment. The Magnet An enthralling blend of adventure and...

Bridles

Catamaran Anchor Bridle

A bridle system needs the following characteristics The rode line to the anchor drogue parachute should be adjustable in length and secured to a winch to enable it to be hauled in. The bridle arms should be at least the width of the beam. They also need to have enough length to be adjustable especially when used to help steer the multihull . An exception to this rule is if you expect wind against tide conditions. Then the bridle arms should be short enough not to run under the centreboard s ....

Righting

They need assistance. Know your options when organising to right Righting a capsized multihull using only the crew is possible - it is done on off the beach multihulls every day. There are many techniques that designers and owners have set up but few that have been used or tested in-situ. The problem is that a multihull is very stable inverted. To crew-only right that stability has to be broken through flooding or pumping water into hulls and providing a lifting force...

Capsize Prevention

Yacht Capsized Breaking Wave

Capsize is something every multihuller should be prepared for despite the fact that it is rare amongst cruising multihulls. It can happen and those crews and yachts prepared will survive to live and sail another day. Capsize prevention is a broad topic and probably the main one relevant to multihull seamanship. The three main areas included in this chapter are The human factor Wave factors Wind factors Escape hatches The inverted hull Cockpit preparation Cabin preparation Calamity packs Post...

Isbn X

There are no hard and fast rules at sea. Sailing is an art and for this reason the author would like to thank those who shared their art and assistance with editing and advice during the production of this book. Those who helped edit the first edition of this book include Ian Johnston and Cathy Hawkins Verbatim - 40ft trimaran Grant Telfer Orient - 71 ft catamaran Dean Snow Trident -31ft trailer trimaran For the Fernhurst edition there have been many who have given advice, suggestions and...