Launching your boat

Check the ramp to make sure that it's clear. Back the vehicle and boat down the ramp until the boat begins to float. If you do not back down the ramp far enough, the boat will be hard to get off the trailer when you are ready to leave. If you back down the ramp too far, the boat will float off the trailer and might get in someone's way or hit the dock and be damaged. If the ramp has room for more than one boat, back straight down on one side of the ramp. This will make it possible for others...

Basic Rescue Tips for Water

Water rescue is similar to any rescue situation. You should be trained, careful, and responsible when attempting to help others. Always be ready to help others, but do not take needless risks. To help in emergencies from a boat Approach an accident scene cautiously. Watch for victims in the water. Check the area for possible risks to yourself and other rescuers. Turn the engine off before picking up victims as long as you don't need it on to maneuver against winds or currents. Communicate with...

Pulling your boat out of the water

Back the trailer down the ramp so that the trailer is partially under water and you attach the winch cable to your boat. Pull the boat up using the winch so that the bow of the boat contacts the bow rest. Carefully center the boat on the trailer so that it rests on the cradles evenly. Raise and secure the outboard or inboard outboard engine. Drive up the ramp in low or first gear. If the drive wheels spin, add weight over the drive axle and try again. Take the boat to the staging area and...

Storing Your Boat and Trailer

Proper storage prevents rust, mildew, dry rot, damaged wheel bearings, and weathered tires. Before storing your boat and trailer for the winter season, check out these tips If you cover your boat with a canvas tarp, prevent mildew and dry rot by allowing air to circulate under the cover. Do not cover your boat before it has dried. Do not use a nylon tarp, because it will trap moisture. If your engine has an open cooling system, such as an outboard, flush it with fresh water before storage. If...

The Anatomy of a Boat

Speed Boat Anatomy

Some boat parts have familiar names, such as windshield, while other parts have names unique to boating. To operate a boat safely, it's necessary to learn the names and locations of the parts of a boat, because you will come across them in manuals, in discussions with other boaters, and on navigation signs and charts. If you do not know the definition of any part, look it up in the glossary at the end of the workbook. General operating guidelines and techniques Maintaining your boat and engine

Water Skiing

Water skiing, a popular sport for powerboat owners, requires extra precautions. Ski boat operators must travel at high speeds and make tight turns, frequent stops, and sudden starts. And skiers are always in the water. At the very least, a water ski team must consist of a boat operator, an observer, and a skier. People enjoying other activities while being towed by a boat must follow the same rules and guidelines for water skiing. Some of these activities include wakeboarding, knee boarding,...

Does your boat need a backfire flame arrestor

All motorboats with enclosed gasoline engines, except those with outboard engines, must have a backfire flame arrestor on each carburetor. The backfire flame arrestor is designed to safeguard against fire and explosion in the engine compartment, and must meet U.S. Coast Guard standards. The flame arrestor screen on each carburetor should be kept clean of any oil or gasoline deposits to prevent ignition of a fire. Check the flame arrestor periodically for damage. If your gasoline engine does not...

Type III flotation aid pounds of buoyancy Inflatable and Inherently Buoyant Types

Good for calm, inland water or where you have a good chance of fast rescue. Generally the most comfortable for continuous wear because of the freedom of movement for activities such as personal watercraft, water skiing, paddling, small boat sailing, and fishing. Not for extended use in rough water. Wearer may have to tilt head back to avoid face-down position in the water. Many individual sizes from child-small to adult.