Step Handwork

At this point rings would be either sewn or pressed into the corners, hanks either sewn or bent onto the luff, cleats screwed onto the sail for the leech and foot lines, the headboard, batten, and luff hardware (in the case of a mainsail) attached, and leatherwork hand-sewn around chafe areas. After this final detailing was done, the sail would be

Figure 6.11

For larger sails the best way to remove shape is to take a fold behind the luff.

A basic reinforcement patch showing graduated layers of fabric distributing the load out into the body of the sail.

A basic reinforcement patch showing graduated layers of fabric distributing the load out into the body of the sail.

A slightly more sophisticated patch made from radial panels.

A mainsail for an Open 50 being finished with heavy tapes along the leech and luff. Note the leechline exiting the tape near the head of the sail.

Near the end of the manufacturing process workers do the detail work like adding cleats and hand sewing leather on corner rings.

Near the end of the manufacturing process workers do the detail work like adding cleats and hand sewing leather on corner rings.

stretched out with pulleys holding the three corners and put through a final inspection. The shape that you saw when the sail was strung up was its molded shape. Once the sail was set on a rig and subjected to the winds and waves, things would change. But for the moment the sailmaker's work was done. It was time to sign the warranty card and ship the sail.

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