Step Second Layout

With the sail in one piece it was returned to the loft floor and laid over the string pattern to see if the sail geometry had shifted during broadseaming. Sometimes the sailmaker would need to remark the head, tack, or clew on the fabric. After that the sailmak-

Figure 6.10

To create a consistent shape throughout the sail, designers employ a technique called broadseaming.

BROADSEAMING

Figure 6.10

To create a consistent shape throughout the sail, designers employ a technique called broadseaming.

The edges of fabric are trimmed with a hot knife that not only cuts the fabric but seals it to stop it from fraying.

Sailmakers roll the sail once it is stuck together so that it can pass through the sewing machine.

Sailmakers roll the sail once it is stuck together so that it can pass through the sewing machine.

Sewing machines are sunk into pits so that it's easier for the seamstress to handle large, cumbersome sails.
Sails are placed on rollers angled toward the sewing machine make it easier for the seamstress to handle large sails and sew a straight row of stitching.

er would draw the luff curve on the sail, a fairly critical part of the design process since the luff curve had to match the curve of whatever spar the sail was going to be set from. If the sail was going on a bendy mast, the curve needed to compensate for the bend while still adding shape. Likewise, a jib luff had to be cut for a particular headstay, taking into account sag. In terms of actually creating this curve the first thing the sailmaker needed to "remove" the shape from the sail since it now had an aerodynamic shape, and that shape, when laid flat, would push out at the edges and create a false edge. This he could do in one of two ways depending on the project at hand. For small sails he could "fan" the sail. In other words he would pin the tack and clew to the floor, and while standing at the head fan the fabric in an effort to trap a pocket of air between the floor and the sailcloth. Once he had a good pocket he would tack the head to the floor. With the body of the sail puffed up in its aerodynamic shape, he could then scribe the luff, leech and foot curves. For larger sails the best way to remove shape was by taking a fold behind the luff (Figure 6.11), i.e., laying the sail out on the floor and flaking it parallel to the luff so that the broadseam shape would be sucked up by the fold and the luff would lie flat and true. It would then be possible to lay a batten down the length of the luff, bend it to match the design offsets and draw the luff curve. The same would then be done for the leech and foot. After the excess fabric had been trimmed, the sail was ready for the next stage.

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