The Storm

A storm jib must be engineered and built for extreme conditions. It usually has a high clew and no foot round so the waves crashing over the foredeck will be able to pass easily under the sail (Figure 9.1 on page 140). The fabric must be heavy enough to withstand not only the loads imposed on it by gusts, but more importantly, the flogging that occurs when the sail is set. For boats 30 to 40 feet in length, the fabric should be a woven Dacron weighing no less than 10 ounces. For boats above 40 feet the fabric should be at least 12 ounces or even 14 ounces. A well-built storm jib should have reinforcement patches sewn behind each hank, since when it is being hoisted a lot of point-loading occurs at each hank and without a reinforcement patch these areas could be potential

Storm sails on board Bobst Group Armor lux as Bernard Stamm sails into New Zealand at the end of Leg 3 of the 2002/03 Around Alone race.

Storm sails on board Bobst Group Armor lux as Bernard Stamm sails into New Zealand at the end of Leg 3 of the 2002/03 Around Alone race.

Photo by Roy Riley, Marinepics

Figure 9.1

A storm jib must be engineered and built for extreme conditions - typically with a high clew and no foot round so the waves crashing over the foredeck will be able to pass easily under the sail.

STORM JIB

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