A design thats not all things to all sailors

24' 3" 24' 3" 17' 5" 3' 0" 30' 6"

outboard 3 to 6 hp 39%

George Stadel Allied Boats 1968-1972 264 sq. ft. portable 15 gal.

Min./max. draft: Bridge clearance: Power: B/D ratio:

24' 3" 24' 3" 17' 5" 3' 0" 30' 6"

outboard 3 to 6 hp 39%

Designer: Builder:

Years produced: Sail area: Fuel tankage: Water tankage:

George Stadel Allied Boats 1968-1972 264 sq. ft. portable 15 gal.

Approx. trailering wgt.: 5,700 lbs.

George Stadel's design for the Greenwich 24, the smallest sailboat ever produced by Allied Boats, was sold to the new Cape Dory Company in 1972, and after the design underwent some minor modifications, became the highly successful Cape Dory 25 (page 329). The Greenwich 24, billed by Allied as a "daysailer, coastal cruiser, racer, gunkholer with the kids," features relatively low freeboard, which gives her hull a sleek, traditional look. She has good ventilation, with a large forward hatch, main hatch, and an aft outboard engine hatch with integral cowl vent. Best features: Her relatively shallow 3-foot draft qualifies the Greenwich 24 as a "gunkholer" and "daysailer." Her icebox is accessible from both cockpit and cabin, a great convenience when weekending. Worst features: Although her marketers intimated it, the boat is not all things to all sailors. Her draft is too shallow to let her be close winded, disqualifying her from being a satisfactory "racer." Her galley space is inadequate for more than a casual overnight. (Where, for example, is space for a two-burner stove?) With her narrow stern and longish counter overhang, any significant weight in the cockpit would make her stern-heavy to the point that the scuppers might let water in rather than drain out, and the open motorwell could scoop water underway, slowing the boat and gradually filling the motorwell. As one owner observed, "It did get rather exciting when the gas cans floated up and turned over as the well filled." (If the motor were removed, a flush plug could be inserted.)

Comps LOD Beam MinDr Displ Bllst

Kenner Kittiwake 24 23' 7" 7' 5" 2' 10" 3,800 1,500

Allied Greenwich 24 24' 3" 7' 3" 3' 0" 3,825 1,500

Bridges Point 24 24' 0" 7' 9" 3' 5" 3,944 1,900

Avg.

Max.

Motion

Space

No. of

Head

SA/D

D/L

PHRF

Speed

Index

Index

Berths

room

14.5

303

270

5.6

20.7

351

4

4' 6"

17.3

323

273

5.6

21.6

304

4

4' 7"

17.8

271

246

5.8

20.4

322

2, 3, 4

4' 5"

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How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

Lets start by identifying what exactly certain boats are. Sometimes the terminology can get lost on beginners, so well look at some of the most common boats and what theyre called. These boats are exactly what the name implies. They are meant to be used for fishing. Most fishing boats are powered by outboard motors, and many also have a trolling motor mounted on the bow. Bass boats can be made of aluminium or fibreglass.

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