A shortlived replacement for the Pearson Lark

Min./max. draft: Bridge clearance: Power: B/D ratio:

23' 6" 23' 6" 18' 6" 4' 0" 31' 6"

outboard 4 to 6 hp 42%

Designer: Builder:

Years produced: Sail area: Fuel tankage: Water tankage:

Bill Shaw Pearson Yachts 1968-1969 285 sq. ft. portable 15 gal.

Approx. trailering wgt.: 6,400 lbs.

It is interesting to compare this boat with her near sister-ship, the Pearson Lark 24 (page 305). The Lark was phased out in 1968, the year that the Pearson 24 was introduced. The two boats were more similar than an initial glance might indicate. It looks to us as if the Pearson 24 design uses the same basic hull, but with six inches of the stern counter chopped off, and a new deck mold more in line with what the conservative customer base was looking for in the late 1960s. The traditional cabin house gives a 4-inch boost in headroom, but the Space Index is almost 20 percent lower than the Lark's. The rather unconventional accommodations plan on the Lark was totally revamped on the P24 (to open up more space in the middle of the cabin) by moving the head forward into the V-berth area (requiring elimination of the Lark's hinged seatback facing aft), and eliminating the Lark's elaborate galley storage area. The elegant deck-loading icebox on the Lark is gone, with "provision for a portable ice chest" instead. The Pearson 24 was discontinued the year after she was introduced. We'd rather have kept the Lark. Best features: She's a good (but plain) cruising boat. Worst features: Her comps are probably both faster in light air.

Avg.

Max.

Motion

Space

No. of

Head-

Comps

LOD

Beam

MinDr

Displ

Bllst

SA/D

D/L

PHRF

Speed

Index

Index

Berths

room

Quickstep 24

23' 11"

7' 11"

3' 4"

4,000

1,300

16.4

260

258

5.8

19.1

341

5

4' 5"

Helms 24

24' 0"

8' 11"

4' 2"

4,200

1,850

16.9

207

234

6.1

16.3

520

5

5' 8"

Pearson 24

23' 6"

8' 0"

4' 0"

4,300

1,800

17.2

303

252

5.8

20.7

375

4

4' 9"

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How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

Lets start by identifying what exactly certain boats are. Sometimes the terminology can get lost on beginners, so well look at some of the most common boats and what theyre called. These boats are exactly what the name implies. They are meant to be used for fishing. Most fishing boats are powered by outboard motors, and many also have a trolling motor mounted on the bow. Bass boats can be made of aluminium or fibreglass.

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