Outboard Starting Checklist

Regularly look for wear and changes in the engine condition. Visual inspection tells you about each of the systems. When the engine is running, don't forget to check the oil pressure and waler temperalure gauges periodically. Some boats have alarm lights and buzzers to warn you il dangerous conditions exist. The raw-water intake strainer should be (nsa of grass, plaslic and aquali lite that could clog the system. Fuel filters collect impurities and should be changcd regularly. Oil dipstick...

Changing Headsails

Changing headsails, especially in liigli winds, requires planning. Work with other crew members to get the job done. The wind will want to catch a loose sail on the deck, so make sure you have control of die new jib before it's hoisted and the old jib after its lowered. Q Uniold the new sail. Lower the raised jib and secure it with sail ties or remove it from the deck. Connect the sheets to the new jib. O Bring the folded sail to the headstay and attach the tack to the bow fitting, Then connect...

Steering

Sailboats are steered with either a tiller or a wheel, which is connected to the rudder. The rudder turns the boat by directing the water How. A sharp turn of die rudder slows your forward motion, If you turn the rudder too far, the water flow will stall and your helm (tiller or wheel) will feel unresponsive. Regardless of the steering system, you have to be moving through the water in order for the rudder to turn die boat, wheel turn the wheel in the di reel ion you want to turn just as you...

V

Not a fixed poinl like the true north pole, but slowly wanders. The amount that it changes earch year is also indicated on the compass ruse as an annual increase or decrease, Plotting a course with parallel rulers requires walking the rulers in parallel across the chart to transfer information to or from the compass rose. Plotting, marking locations and courses on a chart, helps you record your progress or plan your trip. Plotting tools, like course protractors and parallel rulers, am used to...

Securing the Boat

The boat can be tied along the side of a slip using single bow and stem lines and spring lines, or it can be secured with Iwo bow lines and two stern lines Before leaving the boat, make sure Ihe hatch boards are in place, and the sliding hatch is secured Do n'r f orget to p I ug in the sii ore power to keep your battery charged, A flatter sail works heiter In high winds. A fuller sail has more power far light winds. A flatter sail works heiter In high winds. Yon can adjust the shape of the sail...

Upwind Docking

It's easier to dock into the wind because windage helps to stop the boat. O Approach the dock at a 45 degree angle. 0 Make a smooth turn into the wind, 0 Reverse the engine, stopping the boat alongside the dock. Secure the bow line to prevent the boat from drilling backward and then secure the other lines. Docking with the wind requires more distance to stop the boat because windage is pushing the boat forward. 0 Approach the dock at a 45 degree angle. 0 Make a gradual arc putting the engine in...

Foxtrot

Fairlead - a Htting that guides a jib sheet or other lines back to the cockpit or along the deck. Fathom - a measurement of the depth of water. One fathom equals six fcct. Fender - a rubber bumper used to protect a boat by keeping it from hitting a dock. Fetch - a course on which a boat can make its destination without having to tack. ('ishhooks - frayed wire that can cut your skin or rip sails. Kitting - 1 piece of nautical harrhvnrie Flake - to lay out a line on dec k using large loops to...

Pull Mode

Sai ling across the wind or upwind, the wind flowing along both sides of a sail creates higher pressure on one side than lhe other side, which pulls the boat forward. On abroad reach and a mn, the wind simply pushes against the sails and moves the boat forward Trim the jib sheet so the sail stays tilled with wind. Keep an eye out for other boats or obstructions. Trims the mainsail, Warns the helmsman if the wind goes behind the main and the boat is sailing by the lee. One or more members of the...

Fresh Water System

Boats carry a limited amount of fresh water. Cheek the quality and quantity of water the tanks hold, because you use it for drinking, cooking and washing. Small boats have a manual pressure system which you pump with your hand or foot to bring water into the sink. Bigger boats have the manual system as well as a pressure system which operates with faucets like the one in your home. Hot water is created by engine heat or by using electricity from a shoreside source. In the boat above, there is a...

Engine and other operating systems

It's a good idea to have checklists for She boat's operating systems, especially those which involve through-hull fittings and electricity, such as the engine, head, batteries and electronics. One or two assigned crew members can run through these lists to make sure the boat's ready to go. Check the bilge for water. Familiarize yourself with the rigging. Any potential problems, such as frayed lines or crossed halyards, can be corrected before you leave the dock. Become attuned to the sailing...

Prop Walk

Prop walk is the tendency of your boat to turn slightly ruther than go in a straight line, especially when backing. The cause is the propeller's direction of rotation. This tendency can be put to good use when you understand which way it moves your boat. You can test your prop walk direction by putting the boat in reverse while still tied to the dock, Compare the volume of water flow on both sides of the hoat. The stern will move away from the greater flow. Dock the boat on the side that it...

Helmsman

Steers the boat in a straight course, watches lor oncoming traffic and monitors the masthead fly to prevent the boat from sailing by the lee. One or more members of the crew need to keep a lookout all around and especially behind the sails tor oncoming traffic. O Helmsman resumes sailing upwind. Crew coils sheets in preparation for another tack. Steering the bow of the lxx.it f'runi one side of the No-Go Zone to the odier is called tacking. During the tack, the sails cross from one side of the...