Storing and transporting a dinghy

Closed Transom Dinghy Drain

You can leave a dinghy on its dolly at the beach or in a boat park or marina and transport it by road on a trailer. For peace of mind and for everyone's safety, the boat should be tied down as securely as possible, with top and bottom covers for maximum protection. When leaving a dinghy unattended, you may need to remove sails, foils, and all loose fittings dinghy gear is expensive to replace and theft does unfortunately happen. Pull halyards tight before you leave the boat when it is windy,...

Rigging a twohanded dinghy

Vago Main Sheet Block

Every dinghy is rigged in a slightly different way and you should familiarize yourself with the manufacturer's instructions for the dinghy you are handling. The rigging sequence shown here is an example of how to rig a typical two-handed dinghy. select a flat location with the dinghy parked securely on its trailer and sufficient space all around. Check for overhead cables and other obstructions. Lay out the mast, boom, and rigging components. The mast may be fitted with a separate wire forestay...

Catamaran launching and landing

Catamaran Trolley Slip

Two hulls mean that a special technique is needed to launch or retrieve a catamaran on its dolly. Once on the water, the catamaran provides the crew with an extremely stable platform as they prepare to leave the beach or come in from sailing. As with any dinghy, you should rig the sails of a catamaran as close to the water as possible. A catamaran dolly has two wheels on a central axle, with supports for the twin hulls. To put the dolly in place, one crew lifts a bow while the other pushes the...

Rigging a singlehanded dinghy

Laser Sailboat Block Block Technique

Popular single-handed dinghies such as the Laser, Topper, and Pico all have similar rigging, which is simple and quick to assemble. With practice, you should be able to get one of these boats rigged and ready to sail in about 15 minutes, though you may need help lifting the mast. The principal feature of all these dinghies is that they have no shrouds or forestay to support the mast. Instead, the mast is self-supporting, with the lower part fitting into a tubular mast step in the foredeck. The...