Dropping the mainsail

Dropping is a reverse procedure of hoisting the mainsail. It is equally important to leave plenty of time and space on the water, with the yacht pointing directly into the wind and the engine running as the mainsail is lowered and stowed.

Keep the boat head to wind while dropping the mainsail.

MANAGING THE DROP

Drop the mainsail in plenty of time, before mooring or entering a marina. choose an area with plenty of space and flat water if possible. The yacht should be pointing into the wind throughout the drop, moving ahead at slow speed with the engine running. the helmsman's view will be obscured during much of this maneuver. it is important to keep well away from other yachts and to delay docking until the mainsail is fully stowed. the crew must keep clear of the boom, which may sway from side to side as the mainsail comes down.

PACKING THE SAIL

it is vital to get the mainsail packed as soon as it is down. the helmsman must prevent the yacht from pitching and rolling during this operation. two or three crew members are needed to flake the mainsail from side to side.

IThe cockpit crew puts the halyard back on to the winch and releases the clutch lever, while the foredeck crew prepares to pull down on the luff. The helmsman motors slowly into the wind with the mainsheet eased.

Let the halyard off slowly, the cockpit crew easing the turns round the drum with one hand and holding the end of the rope in the other.

Let the halyard off slowly, the cockpit crew easing the turns round the drum with one hand and holding the end of the rope in the other.

DROPPING THE MAINSAIL

The foredeck crew pulls down on the luff by hand to prevent the sail from bunching or jamming in the track.

DROPPING THE MAINSAIL

The foredeck crew pulls down on the luff by hand to prevent the sail from bunching or jamming in the track.

4 Having pulled in the mainsheet and fastened the topping lift to prevent the boom from swaying, the crew flake the mainsail from side to side, which involves arranging it in neat folds on top of the boom.

secure the flaked sail with sail ties, which are traditionally tied with reef knots. Beware of shock-cord sail ties—under tension, one end may fly off and hit you in the face.

6 When cruising it is advisable to ensure the mainsail is always ready for a quick hoist in case of engine failure. Leave the halyard looped down around a cleat on the mast.

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How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

Lets start by identifying what exactly certain boats are. Sometimes the terminology can get lost on beginners, so well look at some of the most common boats and what theyre called. These boats are exactly what the name implies. They are meant to be used for fishing. Most fishing boats are powered by outboard motors, and many also have a trolling motor mounted on the bow. Bass boats can be made of aluminium or fibreglass.

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