Jibing a dinghy

When you jibe, the stern turns through the eye of the wind, changing your downwind direction from starboard to port jibe (shown here) or vice versa. The mainsail swings in a wide arc across the boat and is always fully powered, so jibing is challenging in strong winds.

TROUBLE-FREE JiBES

The object of jibing is to change course from one tack to the other (from starboard to port tack in the picture sequence here while sailing downwind. This requires precise control of the tiller, ensuring a smooth turn with the wind behind. As soon as the wind is on the lee side (blowing over the port side of the stern in the photo, right), the helm or crew should help pull the boom across the boat. Don't wait until the wind catches the mainsail on the leeward side and blows it over, which may send the boat in to an uncontrolled jibe. With poor rudder control and the momentum of the boom crossing from side to side, there is a tendency to let the boat round up into the wind and heel over, which is an excellent way to capsize. Keep the boat running deep downwind during the jibe.

IThe helmsman says "Ready to jibe!", the crew replies "Ready!" and the helmsman instructs "Jlbe-oh!" as he or she bears away Into the jibe.

The helmsman moves the tiller to steer into the jibe and then flicks the tiller extension over to the new side while swlvellng to face forward. The boat is allowed to heel slightly to windward to help the turn.

As the boat approaches dead downwind, the helmsman grabs the falls of the malnsheetwith his front hand and keeps steering round into the jibe.

4 When the stern turns through the eye of the wind, the helmsman pulls the mainsail and boom firmly across to the new side, keeping the boat level. Be sure to duck when the boom comes across!

5 The helmsman changes sides without letting go of the mainsheet or tiller extension, in order to maintain control of the boat's balance and direction throughout the jibe.

7 The helmsman adjusts his hands on the mainsheetand tiller a nd corrects the course on the new side. A successful jibe is one where the boat has remained stable and moving smoothly throughout the maneuver.

Many single-handed dinghies are sensitive to jibe. During the turn, you need to keep the dinghy fairly level and the daggerboard should be halfway up to prevent it from tipping over.

the mainsheet (as shown) to pull the boom in a controlled way across to the new side. Duck as the boom comes over, crossing the boat to face forward, with the tiller behind

Many single-handed dinghies are sensitive to jibe. During the turn, you need to keep the dinghy fairly level and the daggerboard should be halfway up to prevent it from tipping over.

the mainsheet (as shown) to pull the boom in a controlled way across to the new side. Duck as the boom comes over, crossing the boat to face forward, with the tiller behind

As the boat bears off into the jibe, take hold of your back on the new side.

How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

Lets start by identifying what exactly certain boats are. Sometimes the terminology can get lost on beginners, so well look at some of the most common boats and what theyre called. These boats are exactly what the name implies. They are meant to be used for fishing. Most fishing boats are powered by outboard motors, and many also have a trolling motor mounted on the bow. Bass boats can be made of aluminium or fibreglass.

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