Radar

Radar is the most interactive aid to navigation. Using it properly demands far more expertise than an electronic fixing aid because its readout comes in the form of a picture which, to the uninitiated, is hard to interpret if not incomprehensible. Buying a radar set, therefore, does not solve all your navigation problems. Nonetheless, the rewards are great for those who persevere, because radar indicates visually many of those things the navigator would like to see with his own eyes but cannot by virtue of darkness, range or poor visibility. These are not only navigational features; the instrument also shows the whereabouts of shipping and small craft so as to form a primary tool for collision avoidance in fog. In the current context, however, we arc interested in the instrument primarily for its navigational capabilities.

Fig 19.3 The EBL gives a bearing relative to the yacht's head in a standard 'head-up' radar display.

Fig 19.4 The effect of a beam width can be compensated to some extent by placing the EBL about 2° 'inside' a headland that is viewed obliquely.

Fig 19.3 The EBL gives a bearing relative to the yacht's head in a standard 'head-up' radar display.

Fig 19.4 The effect of a beam width can be compensated to some extent by placing the EBL about 2° 'inside' a headland that is viewed obliquely.

How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

How To Have A Perfect Boating Experience

Lets start by identifying what exactly certain boats are. Sometimes the terminology can get lost on beginners, so well look at some of the most common boats and what theyre called. These boats are exactly what the name implies. They are meant to be used for fishing. Most fishing boats are powered by outboard motors, and many also have a trolling motor mounted on the bow. Bass boats can be made of aluminium or fibreglass.

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